Ali Hasni's Blog

ratiocination

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on August 31, 2010

It’s a complicated world. The deeper I get into the ways I desire to live, farther things get for me.

Decision making is never easy when it comes down to decisions that shape ones personality. It is even more difficult when there is an opportunity cost, a sacrifice coupled with the decision to make. Now I am able to comprehend how and why most people are circumstanced to what they are.

If paracetamol was a solution to decision making and not just another acetaminophen, Then certainly the company would be the biggest corporation the human race ever witnessed.

It’s not easy to make the right decision, not everyone perceives it. It gets to be more difficult if loved ones are unable to understand the reasons for it. Even if they are able to understand the decisions there are those social barriers, traditions and answering to the people around which one has to face.

People come around saying “be realistic, follow the system, and you will be what you wish to be” I am unable to digest this because, I believe in being the change. My logic bubble is incapable of understanding how one can fight the system being a part of it.

No matter the gravity of the decision, It’s not going to be easy If it is to bring dishonor to loved ones.

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how poor we are >>

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on May 2, 2010

One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the country with the purpose of showing his son how the poor people live so he could be thankful for his wealth.

They spent a couple of days and nights on the farm of what would be considered a very poor family. On their return from their trip, the father asked his son, “How was the trip?” “It was great, Dad.”

“Did you see how poor people can be?” the father asked. “Oh yeah” said the son.
“So what did you… See and learn from the trip?” asked the father.

The son answered, “I saw that we have one dog and they had four. We have a pool that reaches to the middle of our garden and they have a creek that has no end.” “We have imported lanterns in our garden and they have the stars at night.” “Our patio reaches to the front yard and they have the whole horizon.” “We have a small piece of land to live on and they have fields that go beyond our sight.” “We have servants who serve us, but they serve others.” “We buy our food, but they grow theirs.” “We have walls around our property to protect us; they have friends to protect them.” With this the boy’s father was speechless.

Then his son added, “Thanks dad for showing me how poor we are.”

courtesy: Yousuf Sharara

Positive Parenting …

Posted in Personal, Public, Random by Ali on March 18, 2010

Coutesy: Madrasah Al Zahra—DSM

Raising kids is one of the toughest and most fulfilling jobs in the world — and the one for which you may feel the least prepared.  Here are nine child-rearing tips that can help you feel more fulfilled as a parent — and enjoy your kids more, too.

1. Nurture Your Child’s Self-Esteem

Kids start developing their sense of self as babies when they see themselves through their parents’ eyes. Your tone of voice, your body language, and your every expression are absorbed by your kids. Your words and actions as a parent affect their developing self-esteem more than anything else. Praising accomplishments, however small, will make them feel proud; letting kids do things independently will make them feel capable and strong. By contrast, belittling comments or comparing a child unfavorably with another will make kids feel worthless.

Avoid making loaded statements or using words as weapons. Comments like “What a stupid thing to do!” or “You act more like a baby than your little brother!” cause damage just as physical blows do. Choose your words carefully and be compassionate. Let your kids know that everyone makes mistakes and that you still love them, even when you don’t love their behavior.

2. Catch Kids Being Good

Have you ever stopped to think about how many times you react negatively to your kids in a given day? You may find that yourself criticizing far more often than complimenting. How would you feel about a boss who treated you with that much negative guidance, even if it was well-intentioned?

The more effective approach is to catch kids doing something right: “You made your bed without being asked — that’s terrific!” or “I was watching you play with your sister and you were very patient.” These statements will do more to encourage good behavior over the long run than repeated scolding.

Make a point of finding something to praise every day. Be generous with rewards — your love, hugs, and compliments can work wonders and are often reward enough. Soon you will find you are “growing” more of the behavior you would like to see.

The Holy Prophet (s.a.w.w) has said “ Kiss your children often, for every display of affection will raise your status in heaven.”

3. Set Limits and Be Consistent With Your Discipline

Discipline is necessary in every household. The goal of discipline is to help kids choose acceptable behaviors and learn self-control. They may test the limits you establish for them, but they need those limits to grow into responsible adults.

Establishing house rules helps kids understand your expectations and develop self-control. Some rules might include: no TV until homework is done, and no hitting, name-calling, or hurtful teasing allowed.

You might want to have a system in place: one warning, followed by consequences such as a “time out” or loss of privileges. A common mistake parents make is failure to follow through with the consequences. You can’t discipline kids for talking back one day and ignore it the next. Being consistent teaches what you expect.

4. Make Time for Your Kids

It’s often difficult for parents and kids to get together for a family meal, let alone spend quality time together. But there is probably nothing kids would like more. Get up 10 minutes earlier in the morning so you can eat breakfast with your child, or leave the dishes in the sink and take a walk after dinner. Kids who aren’t getting the attention they want from their parents often act out or misbehave because they’re sure to be noticed that way.

Don’t feel guilty if you’re a working parent. It is the many little things you do — making popcorn, playing games, window shopping — that kids will remember.

5. Be a Good Role Model

Young kids learn a lot about how to act by watching their parents. The younger they are, the more cues they take from you. Before you lash out or blow your top in front of your child, think about this: is that how you want your child to behave when angry? Be constantly aware that you’re being observed by your kids. Studies have shown that children who hit usually have a role model for aggression at home.

Model the traits you wish to cultivate in your kids: respect, friendliness, honesty, kindness, tolerance. Exhibit unselfish behavior. Do things for other people without expecting a reward. Express thanks and offer compliments. Fulfill your wajibats without fail. Above all, treat your kids the way you expect other people to treat you.

>>>>> Interesting,,, Seems that, I just have the perfect parents!

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The True Democracy and Islam!

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on March 1, 2010

Ayatollah Sistani declares vote-buying ‘Haraam’

Iraq’s top Shia cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani has issued a Fatwa (religious ruling), declaring vote-buying as Haraam (forbidden) ahead of the country’s parliament elections.

Speaking on behalf of the Ayatollah, Sheikh Abdul Mahdi al-Karbalaei, called on candidates and political parties to respect election laws and avoid trying to influence voter decision through dishonest means.

“Candidates and political entities must adopt a realistic and feasible program to encourage people to vote for them,” Sheikh Abdel Mahdi al-Karbalai told worshippers during the Friday prayers sermon in Karbala’s Imam Hussein mosque.

“They should avoid making unrealistic promises… [They should] also refrain from slandering one another, because it is unacceptable and immoral,” he added.

Karbalai, who is a representative of the leading Shia spiritual leader, also noted that the religious leadership did not favor any particular group or candidate.

He said, however, that showing up at the ballot box on March 7 was not enough, stressing that everyone had a moral responsibility to choose the candidate that they believed would best secure Iraq’s present and future interests.

The cleric also explicitly stated that distributing money, gifts and promises of future handouts to impact election results are an impermissible act based on all religious and ethical principles.

“Accepting these sums is Haraam. Even if you disregard that fact, it would be degrading to Iraq’s national dignity if people start being drawn to a special candidate or group [for these reasons],” he explained.

Vote-buying is not an unheard of phenomenon in the Middle East, but Lebanon is considered on top of the list of regional countries where it is practiced.

According to a New York Times article, foreign money played a major role in determining the result of the country’s latest parliamentary elections, which ended in favor of the pro-West and Saudi-backed March 14 coalition.

Based on the American daily’s report, one adviser to the Saudi government has even confessed that Riyadh had spent hundreds of millions of dollars on the elections in Lebanon, a country that only has a population of four million.

“We’re supporting candidates running against Hezbollah,” the Saudi advisor had told the New York Times.

The paper also said that Saad Hariri, the billionaire leader of the parliamentary majority and a Saudi ally, was alleged to be the biggest election spender.

source: http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=119692&sectionid=351020201

i found a google whack

Posted in Public, Random, Technology by Ali on February 22, 2010

well,, it’s not going to remain for a long time since i am telling you the keyword and many more people are going to write about it and then the the keyword will have many more links to it…

well the climax is that the keyword is “angda punda”

it’s a google whack,,, when you google it,, it returns just one result..

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The Creator’s Creation

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 21, 2010

If Allah helps you, none can overcome you; and if He forsakes you, who is there after Him that can help you? And in Allah (Alone) let believers put their trust. (Surah Al-e-Imran, 3:160)

Fabi Ayyi Aala-i Rabbikuma Tukazziban (So, Oh Jinn and Mankind) Which of the Favors of your RABB (Lord) will you then deny? (Surah Rahman, 55:13)

Please read the fascinating facts and favors we take for granted.

Our heart beats around 100, 000 times every day. Our blood is on a 60,000 mile journey.

Our body has about 5.6 liters (6 quarts) of blood. This 5.6 liters of blood circulates through the body three times every minute. A drop of blood contains 250 million cells.

It takes about 20 seconds for a red blood cell to circle the whole body. The average red blood cell lives for 120 days. Platelets, which are one of the constituents of the blood is produced at the rate of 200 billion per day.

There are 2.5 trillion (give or take) of red blood cells in our body at any moment. To maintain this number, about 2.5 million new ones need to be produced every second by our bone marrow or we give birth to 100 billion red blood cells every day.

Our eyes can distinguish up to one million color surfaces and take in more information than the largest telescope known to man.

Our lungs inhale over two million liters of air every day, without even thinking. They are large enough to cover a tennis court.

Our hearing is so sensitive it can distinguish between hundreds of thousands of different sounds.

Our sense of touch is more refined than any device ever created.

Our brain is more complex than the most powerful computer and has over 100 billion nerve cells.

Considering all the tissues and cells in our body, 25 million new cells are being produced each second. That’s a little less than the population of Canada – every second!

When we touch something, we send a message to our brain at 124 mph.

We have over 600 muscles. We exercise at least 30 muscles when we smile.

We are about 70 percent water. We make one liter of saliva a day.

Our nose is our personal air-conditioning system: It warms cold air, cools hot air and filters impurities.

In one square inch of our hand we have nine feet of blood vessels, 600 pain sensors, 9000 nerve endings, 36 heat sensors and 75 pressure sensors.

We have copper, zinc, cobalt, calcium, manganese, phosphates, nickel and silicon in our bodies.

The amount of carbon in the human body is enough to fill about 9,000 ‘lead’ pencils.

One square inch of human skin contains 625 sweat glands. The human skin contains 280,000 heat receptors.

There are 137 million light sensitive cells in the eye’s retina and the fluid that fills the eye is changed 15 times a day.

Our eyes never grow, and our nose and ears never stop growing. The muscles of the eye move more than 100,000 times a day. Every hour, the human eye can process 36,000 bits of information.

Humans have the ability to distinguish 4,000 to 10,000 smells.

You breathe in about 7 quarts of air every minute. Good! Air is cost free.

The human skull is made up of 29 different bones and the human hand has 27 bones.

Our Brain has over 100 billion nerve cells. There are about 13, 500,00 neurons in the human spinal cord.

The length of human blood vessel is such that it circles the globe two and half times.

Human kidneys have about 1 million nephrons that filters out liquids and wastes.

The human liver performs 500 different functions.

REMEMBER TO WORSHIP THE CREATOR, NOT HIS CREATIONS.

Don’t miss even a single word… Too good

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 18, 2010

An atheist professor of philosophy speaks to his class on the problem science has with God, The Almighty.

He asks one of his new students to stand and…..

Prof: So you believe in God?
Student: Absolutely, sir.

Prof: Is God good?
Student: Sure.

Prof: Is God all-powerful?
Student: Yes.

Prof: My brother died of cancer even though he prayed to God to heal him. Most of us would attempt to help others who are ill. But God didn’t. How is this God good then? Hmm!
(Student is silent.)

Prof: You can’t answer, can you? Let’s start again, young fellow. Is God good?
Student: Yes.

Prof: Is Satan good?
Student: No.

Prof: Where does Satan come from?
Student: From…God…..

Prof: That’s right. Tell me son, is there evil in this world?
Student: Yes.

Prof: Evil is everywhere, isn’t it? And God did make everything. Correct?
Student: Yes.

Prof: So who created evil?
(Student does not answer.)

Prof: Is there sickness, Immorality, Hatred, Ugliness?
All these terrible things exist in the world, don’t they?
Student: Yes, sir.

Prof: So, who created them?
(Student has no answer.)

Prof: Science says you have 5 senses you use to identify and observe the world around you.
Tell me, son…Have you ever seen God?
Student: No, sir.

Prof: Tell us if you have ever heard your God?
Student: No, sir.

Prof: Have you ever felt your God, tasted your God, smelt your God?
Have you ever had any sensory perception of God for that matter?
Student: No, sir. I’m afraid I haven’t.

Prof: Yet you still believe in Him?
Student: Yes.

Prof: According to empirical, testable, demonstrable protocol, science says your GOD doesn’t exist. What do you say to that, son?
Student: Nothing. I only have my faith.

Prof: Yes, Faith. And that is the problem science has.
Student: Professor, is there such a thing as heat?

Prof: Yes.
Student: And is there such a thing as cold?

Prof: Yes.
Student: No sir. There isn’t. (The lecture theatre becomes very quiet with this turn of events.)

Student: Sir, you can have lots of heat, even more heat, superheat, mega heat, white heat, a little heat or no heat. But we don’t have anything called cold. We can hit 458 degrees below zero which is no heat, but we can’t go any further after that. There is no such thing as cold. Cold is only a word we use to describe the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat is energy. Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the absence of it.
(There is pin-drop silence in the lecture theatre.)

Student: What about darkness, Professor? such a thing as darkness Is there?

Prof: Yes. What is night if there isn’t darkness?
Student: You’re wrong again, sir. Darkness is the absence of something. You can have low light, normal light, bright light, flashing light….But if you have no light constantly, you have nothing and its called darkness, isn’t it? In reality, darkness isn’t. If it were you would be able to make darkness darker, wouldn’t you?

Prof: So what is the point you are making, young man?
Student: Sir, my point is your philosophical premise is flawed.

Prof: Flawed? Can you explain how?
Student: Sir, you are working on the premise of duality. You argue there is life and then there is death, a good God and a bad God. You are viewing the concept of God as something finite, something we can measure. Sir, science can’t even explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism, but has never seen, much less fully understood either one. To view death as the opposite of life is to be ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a substantive thing. Death is not the opposite of life: just the absence of it.
Now tell me, Professor. Do you teach your students that they evolved from a monkey?

Prof: If you are referring to the natural evolutionary process, yes, of course, I do.
Student: Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes, sir?
(The Professor shakes his head with a smile, beginning to realize where the argument is going.)

Student: Since no one has ever observed the process of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this process is an on-going endeavor, are you not teaching your opinion, sir? Are you not a scientist but a preacher? (The class is in uproar.)

Student: Is there anyone in the class who has ever seen the Professor’s brain?
(The class breaks out into laughter.)

Student: Is there anyone here who has ever heard the Professor’s brain, felt it, touched or smelt it? No one appears to have done so. So, according to the established rules of empirical, stable, demonstrable protocol, science says that you have no brain, sir. With all due respect, sir, how do we then trust your lectures, sir?
(The room is silent. The professor stares at the student, his face unfathomable.)

Prof: I guess you’ll have to take them on faith, son.
Student: That is it sir…. The link between man & god is FAITH. That is all that keeps things moving & alive.

This is a true story, and the student was none other than….
APJ Abdul Kalam ,
The former President of India…

Remembrance of death

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 13, 2010

Often the Holy Quran severely criticises those who do not believe in the Day of Judgement. At times we find it condemning those who believe in the Day, but are negligent of it. Therefore, traditions emphasise the visitation of graves, so that man may remember death. In our daily prayers, we recite, Arabic ‘Master of the Day of Judgment’ a number of times, so that our attention is turned towards the ‘Day of Judgment.’

A major portion of our supplications are devoted to discussion on death and the Day of Judgement, so that man may wake up from the slumber of negligence.

If we ponder over reality, we learn that the world deceives the one who craves for it. On the other hand, the one who is attentive towards death and whose heart is aware of the Hereafter, does not fall for the lure of death. One who keeps death in front of his eyes and awaits for it, not only performs his routine tasks sincerely, but constantly strives to do more actions which becomes the cause of Allah’s satisfaction. He is aware that death can overtake him at any moment and he does not have time on his side.

The Holy Prophet (s.a.w.s.) says,

‘Surely the heart rusts like iron.’ People inquired, ‘How can it be polished?’ He (s.a.w.s.) said, ‘By remembering death and with the recitation of Quran.’

(Nahjul Fasahah)

So let us from today resolve to remember death at all times and perform all our actions with that thought in our minds. Let us collect deeds for our hereafter and make piety and abstinence our constant companions.

Source: al-muntazar ezine

Racial Profiling >>matter of grave concern

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 6, 2010

Editor’s note: Nafees A. Syed, a senior at Harvard University majoring in government, is an editorial editor at The Harvard Crimson as well as a senior editor and columnist for the Harvard-MIT journal on Islam and society, Ascent. She is chairwoman of the Harvard Institute of Politics Policy Group on Racial Profiling.

(CNN) — It seems that now someone called “Barack Hussein Obama” can be pulled aside and patted down merely because of his name. But while our president has the benefit of Air Force One, millions of us with a “funny name” (Muslim and otherwise) do not. Like me.

I’ve consistently faced “random” selections for extra screening at the airport after I decided to wear the hijab, or Muslim head covering. I’ve been told to take my head scarf off or have my head probed while the passengers in front of me offered pitying smiles as they rushed to their flights.

One time, the woman in front of me had a hairdo that could pose more of a security threat than any head scarf could. Muslim women wear the hijab as a symbol of modesty, to be judged not by their appearance.
The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. dreamed that people would be judged for “the content of their character.” However, the Transportation Security Administration is judging me and other Muslims by the way we look.
The TSA uses the hijab to profile Muslim women, and passengers can now expect a full-body pat-down, an appallingly invasive “enhanced pat-down search that could include the chest and groin, or a planned “mind-scan” that would track people’s reaction to terrorist symbols. What’s next, palm reading?

At an airport with a full body scanner, I can have the image of my body displayed before a stranger — virtual nudity. Do they seriously have a blank check on our bodies? Of course I care about profiling partly because I’m affected. But does one have to face this issue to feel that it’s wrong? After all, it is difficult to imagine ourselves in other people’s shoes when we don’t have to.

It’s hard for me too. Especially over the past month, I’ve been shocked at the comments about my faith, and the sometimes-prejudiced support for racial profiling. Radio host Mike Gallagher said, “There should be a separate line to scrutinize anybody with the name Abdul or Ahmed or Mohammed.” Sorry Paula Abdul and Muhammad Ali, or anyone with the world’s most common name, Muhammad.

For people who aren’t affected by racial profiling at airports, imagine this: The TSA implements a new rule to counter drunken driving, which kills over 13,000 Americans every year. People who are not Muslim have to go through a Breathalyzer test before they can enter their vehicle. Muslims don’t drink alcohol and are, therefore, exempt. Ridiculous? I agree.

I know that what I am going through is just the tip of the iceberg of racial profiling in our country. Thirty-two million Americans report that they have been the victims of racial profiling. Racial profiling violates the U.S. Constitution, is ineffective and trickles down to the workplace, schools and elsewhere.

You also run into problems when you justify profiling nearly one in every four people in the world. There are Muslims of every possible race, making profiling practically futile. Fareed Zakaria said it best: “When you’re trying to find a needle in a haystack, adding hay does not help you.”

Putting ethical and pragmatic reasons aside, it’s hard to justify not caring. Even if racial profiling doesn’t affect us, it affects our friends, family members, co-workers, doctors, television personalities — the list goes on. There are some people who don’t know Muslims and are numb to realizing the effects of profiling. Therein lies the problem.

According to the Pew Research Center, people who know Muslims are less likely to have negative views of them. Co-existence is a dismal possibility unless people go to the source to find out about Islam, not skewed Web sites.

And Muslims, here’s something to think about: If your knowledge of Islam came from common stereotypes, wouldn’t you also be misinformed about the faith and its followers? The Quran says, “[God has] made you into nations and tribes, so that you might come to know one another (49:13).” So get to know your fellow Americans.

There are some Americans who think Muslims are terrorists and some Muslims who think that other Americans are willfully ignorant. Neither group deserves such a label. Psychologist Henri Tajfel, who was a Holocaust survivor, explained how we isolate ourselves into an “in-group” and facilitate discrimination of an “out-group.”
Religious profiling boxes Muslims into a category separate from Americans. We can’t accept that distinction. Let’s all think outside of the box.

It’s essential for U.S. security that airport screening be done. But we need to stop the inflation of procedures that make our society more afraid and less secure. The TSA needs to stop and evaluate methods that are more effective, less invasive, and don’t discriminate based on religion or race.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Nafees A. Syed.

Wuzu Machines

Posted in Public, Random, Technology by Ali on February 2, 2010
Wuzu Machine

Wuzu Machine

I found this great stuff while reading the e-papers.
Innovation Found!

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters Life!) – A Malaysian company has invented a machine it says will help Muslims purify themselves before prayers without excessively wasting water.

The ornate, green-colored machine comes with automatic sensors and basins to curb water usage during wudu, an Arabic word used to describe the act of washing the face, arms and legs before prayers.

The wudu, or ablution, rite precedes the five daily prayers Muslims are obligated to perform. There are more than 1.7 billion Muslims in the world, with the majority in Africa and the Middle East where water supplies are scarce.

Inventors AACE Technologies is counting on rich countries in these two regions to snap up the machines that will be available in the next six months and cost $3,000-$4,000 a piece.

“Saving water is a motivation for people to adopt this system rather than the conventional methods, where there’s a lot of water wastage,” AACE Chairman Anthony Gomez told reporters while launching the product in the Malaysian capital.

The device, which also emits recorded Koranic verses and is 1.65 meters (5 ft 4.96 in) tall, only uses 1.3 liters (0.3 gallons) of water compared to the conventional methods, which usually involve leaving faucets running for the duration of the washing ritual, which can last for several minutes, Gomez said.

“During the Haj, two million people used 50 million liters water a day for wudu. If they introduce this machine they are saving 40 million liters per day,” he said, referring to the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca.

The Gulf city of Dubai has shown interest in acquiring the product for its airport, Gomez said, adding that the machine took two years to develop at the cost of $2.5 million.

AACE also wants to target mosques and offices with new models that can be wall mounted in a group of six.

Muslims heading for prayers in mainly Muslim Malaysia had mixed feelings about the high-tech, but pricey, invention.

“The idea is good and it is built in line with Islamic teachings. But water in this country is cheap, so it is still not worthwhile to have this machine,” an officeworker who gave his name as Aminuddin told Reuters.

But a tourist from neighboring Singapore, which has little water supplies, said the machine would help conserve natural resources.

“Nothing is impossible. Of course we are trying ways and means to new products, those that can save mankind, those that can save nature,” Azman Mohamed Noor

(Writing by Niluksi Koswanage, editing by Miral Fahmy)